Process Mapping in Six Sigma

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Mapping and improving your organization’s processes is becoming increasingly important. As we move forward, organizations are building more and more functions, all with different purposes, touching various departments and delivering other products. As these become more complex and organizations grow, knowing how to map, analyze and improve these processes is a skill that becomes vital.

What is the Process of Mapping Six Sigma?

Process Mapping Six Sigma is the graphical display of the steps, events, and operations that make up a process.

A graphical technique for dissecting a process by capturing and integrating the combined knowledge of everyone associated with the process.

What is the Process of Mapping Six Sigma?

 

Process Mapping Six Sigma is the graphical display of the steps, events, and operations that make up a process.

A graphical technique for dissecting a process by capturing and integrating the combined knowledge of everyone associated with the process.

Process Mapping in Six Sigma

Why use Process Mapping Six Sigma?

From a communication and collaboration perspective, when one wants to improve the existing processor to introduce changes in the process in an organization, the process map acts as an excellent visual to display how the process is operating.

· Identify communication issues or delivery issues
· Facilitate faster decision-making based on facts rather than subjective learning styles
· Identify the stakeholders involved in the process
· Identify who should be involved in your project to improve the process

We generally use a flowchart to map processes through several phases of a Six Sigma project. One such flowchart is present below:

Learn Process Mapping in Six Sigma

Getting started with Process Mapping Six Sigma-

Step 1: Identify input/output (Bird’s-eye view)

Identify the reason for creating the process map. Start by listing the names of the processes and resulting input/output.
Identify external inputs, raw materials, energy requirements, and incoming information. Focus first on what the processes are rather than how they interact.

Step 2: Identify all the stages of the process

Include all value-added and non-value-added steps. The purpose must be clearly defined, i.e., what parameters or conditions will ultimately satisfy the request.
Identify the process steps, inspection/test, rework, and loss points.

Step 3: Classify input variables

• Controllable inputs: The input variables in the hands of the team can be controlled or altered.
• Noise inputs: Inputs that affect outputs and are not controllable or too expensive to control
• Standard operating procedure: Inputs defined by operating procedures, e.g., Cleaning, Budget, and Maintenance

Step 4: Documenting the process
Documenting the process map involves putting the steps and information gathered above into a coherent, easy-to-understand diagram. The best way to do this is to use a flowchart and use the flowchart symbols as illustrated above.
Based on systems and roles, proper scheduling of people involved, tasks involved, and estimated time.

Step 5: Obtain feedback and launch
Once the process map is complete, gather feedback from those who will implement the process and other stakeholders, and those who may not directly play a role in the workflow but are indirectly interested in it. This feedback aims to ensure that the process map is clear and complete.
If you identify any areas in the process map that need clarification or refinement during the training process, make those changes now, before the procedure is active.
This involves reviewing process documentation, getting feedback, and testing changes before returning for the next training session.

Mistakes to avoid while Process Mapping Six Sigma 

1. Do not map the process as you think it should happen. Map it as it is currently happening.
2. Do not attempt to map a process until you have identified the
start and end.
3. Don’t get bogged down in the details.
You can add details after a high-level flow is generated.

Learn Process Mapping in Six Sigma

What is value stream mapping (VSM), and how is it different from process mapping?

Process Mapping Six Sigma is a step-by-step approach to the process, including inputs, outputs, and departments involved in the consequent step form. At the same time, VSM shows essential parameters such as cycle time, lead time, inventory or lead time, percentage complete and accuracy, and the number of operators. It helps identify, demonstrate and reduce waste and creates an efficient flow through all production or business processes.

Value stream mapping is a valuable tool for minimizing waste in any operation, not just output. The practical implementation of value stream mapping in an organization shows the entire process flow operations and highlights areas of inefficiency and opportunities for optimization. Including processing times, error rates, and backlogs.

By applying Process Mapping training across your business, you can identify and validate areas of opportunity and set your organization on a path to continuous improvement that helps your business achieve its goals. To understand Process Mapping Six Sigma and VSM, individuals and business teams should be educated in Lean Six Sigma Process Mapping or Value Stream Mapping training courses to bring real value to the organization.

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